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Guichet® Nail

The Guichet® nail can be used in three different bones: the tibia, the humerus or the femur. The tube is rotated mechanically, increasing its length. Normally, it takes up to 10 days to grow by 1cm.

Engineered for Maximum Recovery

Every line of The Guichet® Nail is exquisitely engineered, making it incredibly strong without losing any ease of use. It has worldwide recognition as the sole commercialised nail with full weight bearing capacities.

The Guichet Nail allows patients to walk on the same day as surgery. On top of that, mere days later you will be able to go back to work and play all the sports you like.

 

The nail works so well that painkillers will only be required for two weeks after treatment.

Your Safety Is Our Priority

The Guichet Nail only uses the best metals, allowing you to reach heights you never thought possible. This way, you need fewer operations and fewer drugs.

 

Dr Guichet and the Guichet Nail reports zero noteworthy patient complication since its commercialization in 1994. And as a proof, Dr Guichet engages himself to sign on those statistics.
To insert the nail, small incisions have to be made. But these incisions are so small, they are barely noticeable.

 

Please read the following section for a technical explanation of the procedure.

Femur

Good healing of the gain zone; (below): Patient before and fater a 5 cm lengthening of the right femur (discrepancy of length).

Good healing of the gain zone; (below): Patient before and fater a 5 cm lengthening of the right femur (discrepancy of length).

Principle

The Guichet nail enters through the top of the femur, which is located just above the hip. An incision of 1-2cm is made, allowing the nail to penetrate the bone canal. Once the nail is fixed at the two ends of the bone, it locks in place. The incisions are then closed.

Ratcheting

When the lower limb moves inward and outward, the nail ratchets, creating a bigger gap between the two bone fragments. For more information see the page on ‘Ratcheting’.

Specifics

Ratcheting is only slightly painful, at most if the patient has not made preparations before the operation. If the patient is relaxed throughout the treatment, the clicks will come easier.

X-rays after a bilateral lengthening of 8.5 cm.

X-rays after a bilateral lengthening of 8.5 cm.

Tibia

Patient before and after a correction of tibial axis and a lenghtening of 5 cm with the intramedullary nail for a discrepancy. On the right, photo after full correction.

Patient before and after a correction of tibial axis and a lenghtening of 5 cm with the intramedullary nail for a discrepancy. On the right, photo after full correction.

Principle

A small incision is made and the Guichet nail goes into the peak of the tibia, which is located near the knee.
The tibia nail controls the lengthening process. As it grows longer, both the fibula and tibia will be lengthened due to their proximity.

Ratcheting

Ratcheting in the tibia is easier and less painful than in the femur. The patient turns their foot inwards and outwards to hasten the lengthening process.
tibia-cases

Patient (dwarfism) with a 10 cm tibial lengthening (external fixator) followed by a 16 cm femoral lenghtening using the lengthening nail.

Patient (dwarfism) with a 10 cm tibial lengthening (external fixator) followed by a 16 cm femoral lenghtening using the lengthening nail.

Specifics

The tibia does not heal as easily as the femur because it is far longer.
For cosmetic purposes, lengthening the femur is preferred. This is especially true for women, who will be able to wear high-heels without discomfort.
Patients should rest for one or two weeks before returning to work. The growth happens very slowly, at a pace of 1mm a day.
To heal, it takes well over a year. It is recommended that patients play no sports at all during the treatment.

Scars

Whichever technique is used, lengthening the tibia creates up to 11 visible scars in various places.

Humerus

Patient 3 weeks after the surgery (humeral/arm Albizzia insertion) holding the Albizzia nail in his hand. He already got a 2.4 cm of gain (1 inch).

Patient 3 weeks after the surgery (humeral/arm Albizzia insertion) holding the Albizzia nail in his hand. He already got a 2.4 cm of gain (1 inch).

Principle

In cases of large limb length discrepancy, lengthening of the arm is needed. Occasionally in dwarfism, when arm length restricts ability to reach light switches or taps and lowering of these things is completely impossible, it may also be worth considering arm lengthening.
The nail goes inside the bone from top to bottom and is locked in place, much like in the femur and tibia lengthening processes.

Specifics

Humerus ratcheting is almost pain free. After the first three weeks, the patient can do anything they want to. But those three weeks of rest are very important, as they allow the body to heal. Walking should be no problem after one day, and using the toilet and eating will definitely be possible after a week. Patients can return to work during the lengthening period if they so wish.
The bone grows very slowly at 1mm per day. Some sports can be played in during the treatment, but nothing too heavy is recommended.
If a patient has a history of neurological lesion, humeral lengthening is too risky to be carried out in any way shape or form.

Ratcheting

Moving the forearm back and forth allows the nail to lengthen the arm.